Low/Decreased Fat Diet

Low/Decreased Fat Diet: Overview

Not all fat is bad for the body, and when people avoid it altogether, they avoid healthy foods that provide valuable nutrients.  It is important to distinguish between good fats and bad fats, and to cut out the latter.  When you reduce fat in your diet, you should focus on "unnatural" fats – oils and fats that have been processed (using hydrogenation, for example).  Many of them oxidize easily and are missing some of their original nutrients.

Diagnose your symptoms now!
  • check your overall health status
  • understand what's happening to your body
  • learn what you should be doing right now

For example, while a diet low in saturated fat is a major way to combat heart disease, a diet low in omega-3 fats and monounsaturated fats could be counterproductive.  You do need to have some fat in your diet.  The ones that are best for you are monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, which come from plant sources like peanuts and olives.

Instructions

Reducing fat in your diet doesn't mean you will face a life of tasteless dry meals and fat-free cookie boxes in your cupboards.  Here are some suggestions:

  • Decrease or eliminate animal products that are high in fat.  This includes red meat, poultry and some dairy products, such as whole milk, cream and butter.  If you do eat meat, choose the leanest cuts of meat, poultry and fish available.
  • Check health-oriented cookbooks for new recipe ideas.
  • Fill up on fruits, vegetables, and grains, the foods at the base of the food guide pyramid.  Think of meat as a side dish instead of as the center of your meal.
  • Try main dishes that feature pasta, rice, beans, and/or vegetables.  Or create low-meat dishes by mixing pasta, rice, beans, and vegetables with small amounts of lean meat, poultry, or fish.
  • Increase the amount of fresh vegetables and fruit in your diet.  Eat them raw (whole or juiced) whenever possible.
  • Use cooking methods that require little or no fat.  You can bake, broil, steam, roast, poach, stir-fry, and microwave.  You can sauté in very small amounts of oil.  You can also use broth, cooking sherry, wine, or even water to sauté.
  • Select low-fat or nonfat alternatives when they are available.  Choose nonfat yogurt over regular, for example.
  • Eat low-fat cheese and drink skim milk or alternatives such as soy or rice milk.
  • Remove the skin from chicken or turkey.
  • Snack on fresh fruit, chips that are baked rather than fried, or air-popped popcorn.
  • Watch labels.  Low-calorie does not always mean low-fat.

On This Page

Low/Decreased Fat Diet:

Low/Decreased Fat Diet can help with the following:

Circulation

Diet

Infections

Metabolic

Problems Caused By Being Overweight

Reducing fat in the diet may reduce cancer risk and, in helping weight control, may reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes.  [The National Cancer Institute booklet, "Diet, Nutrition, & Cancer Prevention: A Guide to Food Choices"]

Organ Health

Consequences of Gallbladder Surgery

The long-term side-effects can be reduced or eliminated for people who have no gallbladder by eating a low-fat, high-fiber diet.  Fat is the primary stimulus for bile acid production.  On a low-fat diet much less bile acid is produced.

Macular Degeneration

Some scientists have suggested an association between macular degeneration and high saturated fat, low carotenoid pigments, and other substances in the diet.

Parasites

Giardiasis Infection

Reducing the intake of fat might reduce the nausea, steatorrhea, and diarrhea often associated with giardiasis.  Dietary fat is also the main stimulator for the release of bile acids into the intestinal lumen, which giardia trophozoites depend on for survival in the small bowel.

Reproductive

Fibrocystic Breast Disease

Fibrocystic disease has been linked to excess estrogen.  When those with fibrocystic disease are put on a low-fat diet, their estrogen levels decrease.  After three to six months, the pain and lumpiness also decrease.  The link between fat and symptoms appears to be most strongly related to saturated fat.  Foods high in saturated fat include meat and dairy products.  Fish, nonfat dairy, and tofu are possible replacements.

Skin-Hair-Nails

Psoriasis

A "moderate" diet is best in coping with psoriasis, without an excess of rich, fatty, starchy or spicy foods, or alcohol.

Concerned or curious about your health?  Try The Analyst™
Symptom Entry
Symptom Entry
Diagnosis
Diagnosis
Suggestions
Suggestions
LifeMeter
LifeMeter®
Full Explanations
Explanations
Optional Doctor Review
Review (optional)

Low/Decreased Fat Diet can help prevent the following:

Circulation

Digestion

Heartburn / GERD / Acid Reflux

Fats are the most difficult component of the diet to digest, remaining in the stomach longer and thus causing the need for more stomach acid in order to digest them.  Fatty foods cause more indigestion than proteins or starches.

Tumors, Malignant

Breast Cancer

There has been much recent research on the relationship between cancer and dietary fat – possibly more than on any other component of the diet.  A connection between high fat consumption and breast and colon cancer (two of the most deadly forms of the disease) has appeared in many studies.  Experts recommend that you consume no more than 20-25% of calories from fat.  That's about half of the fat that most Americans eat.  You should also choose modest amounts of appropriate vegetable oils.

Colon Cancer

There has been much recent research on the relationship between cancer and dietary fat – possibly more than on any other component of the diet.  A connection between high fat consumption and breast and colon cancer (two of the most deadly forms of the disease) has appeared in many studies.  Experts recommend that you consume no more than 20-25% of calories from fat.  That's about half of the fat that most Americans eat.  You should also choose modest amounts of appropriate vegetable oils.

Prostate Cancer

It may be possible to reduce the risk by avoiding a high fat diet through, for example, cutting down on dairy foods and red meat.

Report by The Analyst™
Click to see sample report
Health problems rarely occur in isolation or for obvious reasons

Your body is a highly complex, interconnected system.  Instead of guessing at what might be wrong, let us help you discover what is really going on inside your body based on the many clues it is giving.

Our multiple symptom checker provides in-depth health analysis by The Analyst™ with full explanations, recommendations and (optionally) doctors available for case review and answering your specific questions.

KEY

May be useful: may help with; may help prevent
May be useful:
may help with; may help prevent
Moderately useful: often helps with; often prevents
Moderately useful:
often helps with; often prevents
Very useful: is highly recommended for; usually prevents
Very useful:
is highly recommended for; usually prevents