Moodiness

What Causes Moodiness?

Moodiness can have various causes, just like most other symptoms.  Finding the true cause means ruling out or confirming each possibility – in other words, diagnosis.

Diagnosis is usually a complex process due to the sheer number of possible causes and related symptoms.  In order to diagnose moodiness, we could:
  • Research the topic
  • Find a doctor with the time
  • Use a diagnostic computer system.
The process is the same, whichever method is used.

Step 1: List all Possible Causes

We begin by identifying the disease conditions which have "moodiness" as a symptom.  Here are two possibilities:
  • Mercury Toxicity
  • Low Pregnenolone

Step 2: Build a Symptom Checklist

We then identify all possible symptoms and risk factors of each possible cause, and check the ones that apply:
dark spots on gums
being easily excitable
poor balance
cold sores
minor joint pain/swelling/stiffness
occasional confusion/disorientation
heart racing/palpitations
having trouble concentrating
moderate mercury toxicity
angry/hostile disposition
having amalgam fillings
frequent sore throats
... and more than 30 others

Step 3: Rule Out or Confirm each Possible Cause

A differential diagnosis of your symptoms and risk factors finds the likely cause of moodiness:
Cause Probability Status
Low Pregnenolone 94% Confirm
Mercury Toxicity 54% Possible
* This is a simple example to illustrate the process

Arriving at a Correct Diagnosis

The Analyst™ is our online diagnosis tool that learns all about you through a straightforward process of multi-level questioning, providing diagnosis at the end.

In the Emotional Symptoms section of the questionnaire, The Analyst™ will ask the following question about moodiness:
How often do you get into a bad mood?
Possible responses:
→ Don't know
→ Never/rarely - I am generally balanced/cheerful
→ I usually have a few bad moods each year
→ I am regularly in a bad mood
→ Very often - several times a week on average
Based on your response to this question, which may indicate absence of moodiness, slight moodiness, moodiness or extreme moodiness, The Analyst™ will consider possibilities such as:
... and also rule out issues such as: