Increased Fish Consumption

Increased Fish Consumption: Overview

Compared to most meats and poultry, fish is much lower in total fat and saturated fat, is a source of very high-quality protein, supplies lots of vitamins and minerals and contains high levels of omega-3 fatty acids.  By adding one or two fish meals to your family's diet each week, you can net some very hefty health benefits.

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Side-Effects

Note: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have issued advisories about eating fish that may contain harmful levels of mercury.  The fish included in the advisories are freshwater fish and some larger types of saltwater fish.  The advisories are intended primarily for pregnant women, women who may become pregnant, and young children.

Mercury is found naturally in nature, but pollution has greatly increased the amount found in the ocean and freshwater streams and lakes.  While most mercury pollution is released into the air, it often finds its ways into waterways.  Bacteria in the water can transform mercury into a more toxic form called methyl mercury.  Methyl mercury is a potent poison and is especially dangerous for pregnant women and young children.  Exposure to large amounts of methyl mercury can damage the nervous system and impair mental development.

The FDA advisory singled out these large saltwater fish: shark, swordfish, tilefish, and king mackerel.  Methyl mercury can be found in all fish; however, long-lived, larger fish that eat smaller fish tend to have higher levels of methyl mercury in their bodies.

The EPA said that the same groups included in the FDA advisory should limit their consumption of fish caught by family and friends (non-commercial fish).  The EPA said that many state and local agencies monitor their waters for substances such as methyl mercury.  Because some areas have greater mercury contamination than others, the EPA urged people to check with these agencies to see what they recommend.

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Increased Fish Consumption:

Increased Fish Consumption can help with the following:

Autoimmune

Multiple Sclerosis

The Swank diet includes eating fish at least 3 times per week.  Alternately, fish oils could be substituted at 1500mg three or more times per week.

Diet

Not recommended for
Not recommended for
Not recommended for

Environment / Toxicity

Not recommended for
Mercury Toxicity (Amalgam Illness)

There is increasing concern over fish, which are being found to contain significant levels of mercury.  These levels are coming from eating smaller fish which have been bio-accumulating mercury over time.  The large predator fish, such as swordfish/marlin, ahi (yellow fin tuna), king mackerel, shark (often sold as imitation crab), and tilefish have the highest accumulations because they are at the top of the food chain (well, almost!) Many people who consume significant amounts of these fish are showing very elevated levels of mercury in their hair.  The FDA is currently recommending most other fish as safe for consumption at amounts of 1kg per week or less.

Mental

Not recommended for
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Nearly all fish and shellfish contain traces of mercury, which it is believed can reduce childrens' ability to concentrate.  The main types of fish to avoid include shark, swordfish, king mackerel and tilefish.

Reproductive

Not recommended for
Motherhood Issues

Based on the recommendations of the Environmental Working Group and the U.S.  Public Interest Research Group, it is recommended that shark, swordfish, king mackerel and tilefish, tuna, sea bass, halibut, marlin, pike, Gulf coast oysters and white croaker not be eaten by pregnant women and women of childbearing age who might become pregnant due to mercury contamination.  It also recommended that nursing mothers and young children steer clear of these fish.  In addition, the report says canned tuna, mahi-mahi, cod and pollack should not be eaten more than once a month.

Not recommended for
Pregnancy-Related Issues

Based on the recommendations of the Environmental Working Group and the U.S.  Public Interest Research Group, it is recommended that shark, swordfish, king mackerel and tilefish, tuna, sea bass, halibut, marlin, pike, Gulf coast oysters and white croaker not be eaten by pregnant women and women of childbearing age who might become pregnant due to mercury contamination.  It also recommended that nursing mothers and young children steer clear of these fish.  In addition, the report says canned tuna, mahi-mahi, cod and pollack should not be eaten more than once a month.

"The widespread contamination of fish with mercury has given its reputation as 'brain food' a new and disturbing connotation.  Mercury is toxic to the developing fetal brain, and exposure in the womb can cause learning deficiencies and delay mental development in children."

A Center for Disease Control report finds that an estimated 375,000 babies being born each year at risk of neurological problems due to exposure to mercury in the womb.  The Mercury Policy Project report indicates that at least 10 percent of women of childbearing age have levels of mercury in their bodies that exceed what the U.S.  Environmental Protection Agency considers acceptable and this translates to nearly six million women.

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Increased Fish Consumption can help prevent the following:

Tumors, Malignant

Cancer, General

Study subjects who ate two or more servings of fish weekly had a much lower risk for esophageal, stomach, colon, rectum, and pancreatic cancers than those who avoided fish.  In fact, the rates of these types of cancer were 30 to 50 percent lower among fish eaters.  High fish consumption was also associated with lower risks for cancers of the larynx (30 percent lower risk), endometrial cancer (20 percent lower risk), and ovarian cancer (30 percent lower risk).

Colon Cancer

Study subjects who ate two or more servings of fish weekly had a much lower risk for esophageal, stomach, colon, rectum, and pancreatic cancers than those who avoided fish.  In fact, the rates of these types of cancer were 30-50% lower among fish eaters.  High fish consumption was also associated with lower risks for cancers of the larynx (30% lower risk), endometrial cancer (20% lower risk), and ovarian cancer (30% lower risk).

Esophageal Cancer

Study subjects who ate two or more servings of fish weekly had a much lower risk for esophageal, stomach, colon, rectum, and pancreatic cancers than those who avoided fish.  In fact, the rates of these types of cancer were 30 to 50 percent lower among fish eaters.  High fish consumption was also associated with lower risks for cancers of the larynx (30 percent lower risk), endometrial cancer (20 percent lower risk), and ovarian cancer (30 percent lower risk).

Pancreatic Cancer

Study subjects who ate two or more servings of fish weekly had a much lower risk for esophageal, stomach, colon, rectum, and pancreatic cancers than those who avoided fish.  In fact, the rates of these types of cancer were 30 to 50 percent lower among fish eaters.  High fish consumption was also associated with lower risks for cancers of the larynx (30 percent lower risk), endometrial cancer (20 percent lower risk), and ovarian cancer (30 percent lower risk).

Rectal Cancer

Study subjects who ate two or more servings of fish weekly had a much lower risk for esophageal, stomach, colon, rectum, and pancreatic cancers than those who avoided fish.  In fact, the rates of these types of cancer were 30-50% lower among fish eaters.  High fish consumption was also associated with lower risks for cancers of the larynx (30% lower risk), endometrial cancer (20% lower risk), and ovarian cancer (30% lower risk).

Stomach Cancer

Study subjects who ate two or more servings of fish weekly had a much lower risk for esophageal, stomach, colon, rectum, and pancreatic cancers than those who avoided fish.  In fact, the rates of these types of cancer were 30 to 50 percent lower among fish eaters.  High fish consumption was also associated with lower risks for cancers of the larynx (30 percent lower risk), endometrial cancer (20 percent lower risk), and ovarian cancer (30 percent lower risk).

Laryngeal Cancer

Study subjects who ate two or more servings of fish weekly had a much lower risk for esophageal, stomach, colon, rectum, and pancreatic cancers than those who avoided fish.  In fact, the rates of these types of cancer were 30-50% lower among fish eaters.  High fish consumption was also associated with lower risks for cancers of the larynx (30% lower risk), endometrial cancer (20% lower risk), and ovarian cancer (30% lower risk).

Ovarian Cancer

Study subjects who ate two or more servings of fish weekly had a much lower risk for esophageal, stomach, colon, rectum, and pancreatic cancers than those who avoided fish.  In fact, the rates of these types of cancer were 30 to 50 percent lower among fish eaters.  High fish consumption was also associated with lower risks for cancers of the larynx (30 percent lower risk), endometrial cancer (20 percent lower risk), and ovarian cancer (30 percent lower risk).

Endometrial Cancer

Study subjects who ate two or more servings of fish weekly had a much lower risk for esophageal, stomach, colon, rectum, and pancreatic cancers than those who avoided fish.  In fact, the rates of these types of cancer were 30-50% lower among fish eaters.  High fish consumption was also associated with lower risks for cancers of the larynx (30% lower risk), endometrial cancer (20% lower risk), and ovarian cancer (30% lower risk).

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Should be avoided: is NOT recommended for
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is NOT recommended for