Bentonite Clay

Bentonite Clay: Overview

Bentonite is known for its highly absorptive properties and its ability to draw out and bind heavy metals, drugs and other toxins from the body.

History; Source

Bentonite clay has been used for thousands of years as both an internal and external purification aid.  The Egyptians used it to preserve their famous mummies.  The ancient Greeks and Romans used it to restore health.  The great German naturopaths of the last century hailed clay as one of nature's great remedies.  Mahatma Ghandi advocated the use of clay for health and purification.  Numerous so-called 'primitive' tribes have used clay for both internal and external purification.

Today, Bentonite clay is increasingly used both internally and externally by those interested in natural remedies, and it is included on the FDA's famous GRASS list ("Generally Recognized as Safe").

Bentonite clay is weathered volcanic ash.  It is completely natural, not a drug or chemical composition made in a laboratory.  Bentonite in ages past was blown into the sky by volcanic action, which sifted down to help impregnate the soil with its 25 to 35 trace minerals.

Function; Why it is Recommended

When hydrated, Bentonite generates and maintains a very strong electromagnetic field, which allows it to attract and hold unwanted, non-nutritive substances such as pesticides and other toxins so that they can be eliminated from the body.

Scientific research has shown that bentonite's absorptive action is due to five characteristics:

  1. It has a large and varied mineral content.
  2. It has a negative electrical attraction for positively-charged particles.
  3. Its particles have their wide surfaces negative-polarized and the edges positive-polarized, which give it an incredible negative pulling power.
  4. The very minuteness of the particles of bentonite gives a large surface area in proportion to the volume used, thus enabling it to pick up many times its own weight in positively-charged particles.
  5. To obtain maximum effectiveness in the human body, it must be put in a liquid colloidal-gel state.
In the Medical Annals of the District of Columbia, Vol.  20, No.  6, June, 1961, under the title "The Value of Bentonite for Diarrhea", are the results of the clinical work performed by a team of medical doctors using hydrated bentonite in the treatment of diarrhea.  The diarrhea was the result of virus infections, food allergies, spastic colitis and food poisoning.  The results of the scientific investigation indicated that liquid bentonite provided substantial relief in 97% of the cases.  The percent of relief indicated for the symptoms were: abdominal cramps – 80%; anorexia – 78%; malaise – 80%; headaches – 71%; nausea – 85%; and weakness – 100%.  The article concluded:

"By virtue of its physical action, bentonite serves as an absorbent aid in detoxification of the intestinal canal."

Both U.S.  Government Bureau of Mines Booklet #609 and a late edition of the Dispensatory of the United States of America, an official compendium, give bentonite high praise:

"In addition to the growing number of external uses for bentonite, it has been reported to be of value as an intestinal evacuant when used in the form of a gel."

Instructions

It is important not to take any nutritional supplement at the same time as the bentonite.  Especially when used with psyllium, the bentonite will absorb anything of nutritional value such as herbs, friendly bacteria, and vitamins, as well as toxins, bad bacteria and parasites.  Be sure to wait at least one hour after doing a bentonite shake before taking anything nutritional.

Though bentonite has been used internally by the American Indians for hundreds of years to help detoxify the bowels, some recommend that when using it internally, it is always used with psyllium, as a psyllium shake.  The reason for this is that some people fear that bentonite could get stuck in the gut.  It is not known for certain if this has ever occurred with anyone, but just to be safe, use it with psyllium.

Side-Effects

With increasing public knowledge about minerals, some have expressed concern over the presence of small amounts of aluminum in bentonite clay.  However, hair analyses appear to indicate that the body does not absorb aluminum from Bentonite.

On This Page

Bentonite Clay:

Bentonite Clay can help with the following:

Infections

Skin-Hair-Nails

Bentonite Clay may help with Adult Acne Adult Acne

Bentonite masks may be helpful in drawing out toxins.  These masks are usually left in place for 10 to 15 minutes, removed by rinsing or gentle rubbing with a soft wash cloth and applied three times per week.

KEY

May be useful: may help with
May be useful:
may help with
Moderately useful: often helps with
Moderately useful:
often helps with