BHT (Butylated Hydroxytoluene)

BHT (Butylated Hydroxytoluene): Overview

An FDA-approved preservative for food, oils and fats, this powerful antioxidant is mentioned in books such as Pearson and Shaw's Life Extension and Mann and Fowke's Wipe Out Herpes with BHT.

Why it is Recommended

BHT has been proven effective against every lipid-coated virus in animal and laboratory tests but few human studies have been conducted.  It can be used as a preservative in the storage of oils that might otherwise tend to become rancid.

Instructions

Precautions:
  • Because of conflicting results, no one really knows what the cancer risk – if any – is from BHT.  The possibility should not be ignored; anyone who uses BHT or any synthetic chemical should consider there may be consequences yet unknown from the use of non-naturally occuring chemicals.
  • Most BHT users recommend that no one should take more than 2gm per day, some saying 1gm is the limit.  It should probably also not be taken on an empty stomach.
  • Avoid use in hepatitis or other liver problems.
  • BHT is fat-soluble, so thin people may need less.  Furthermore, persons on low-fat diets may be more susceptible to side-effects.
  • BHT can interfere with blood clotting, so it might be a special risk for persons with hemophilia or other clotting problems.
  • Doses of BHT should start small and gradually increase.  It is probably not harmful to stop abruptly, however, because BHT stays in the body for several weeks.
  • A few people are chemically sensitive to BHT.
  • Alcohol should be avoided for at least several hours after taking BHT.  Alcohol may have a stronger effect than usual, so be especially careful about driving.
  • BHT can interact with other drugs.  It can either increase or decrease their effects.

Counter-Indicators and Warnings

NOTE: Because of the lack of human studies, BHT should only be used experimentally and as a last resort in situations where other treatments have failed.  BHT should not be used casually until further studies are conducted.

On This Page

BHT (Butylated Hydroxytoluene):

BHT (Butylated Hydroxytoluene) can help with the following:

Immunity

BHT (Butylated Hydroxytoluene) may help with HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS

BHT is a potent inactivator of lipid-enveloped viruses.  The viral envelope structure is physically disturbed by BHT, thereby interfering with viral adsorption to host cells.  Since the virus generally believed responsible for AIDS contains a lipid envelope, BHT warrants investigation as a potential antiviral agent against the AIDS virus.  Published scientific evidence strongly suggests that BHT might help in treating AIDS or ARC and that any risks can be kept small.  No one expects BHT to be a cure, but if it can help in the management of AIDS and/or CMV, it would have value now until better treatments become available.

Infections

BHT (Butylated Hydroxytoluene) often helps with Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection

Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) is a potent inactivator of lipid-enveloped viruses.

BHT (Butylated Hydroxytoluene) often helps with Herpes Simplex Type I Herpes Simplex Type I

Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) is a potent deactivator of lipid-enveloped viruses.  Many people throughout the USA are using BHT to successfully keep the lesions dormant, with no sores as long as they consume BHT regularly.  Some people develop sores once every 3-4 months opposed to higher frequency when not using BHT.  The majority of those who use lysine regularly along with 750-1,000mg of BHT daily keep the sores from ever occurring.  The only human antiviral test that has been conducted with BHT was for herpes, the outcome of which was successful.

BHT (Butylated Hydroxytoluene) often helps with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)

Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) is a potent inactivator of lipid-enveloped viruses.

Reproductive

Not recommended for
BHT (Butylated Hydroxytoluene) is NOT recommended for Pregnancy-Related Issues Pregnancy-Related Issues

BHT should not be used supplementally in pregnancy although there is no evidence that consuming foods where it has been added as a food preservative is harmful.

Sexually-Transmitted Diseases

BHT (Butylated Hydroxytoluene) often helps with Herpes Simplex Type II Herpes Simplex Type II

Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) is a potent inactivator of lipid-enveloped viruses.

KEY

May be useful: may help with
May be useful:
may help with
Moderately useful: often helps with
Moderately useful:
often helps with
Should be avoided: is NOT recommended for
Should be avoided:
is NOT recommended for