How Much Coffee You Drink

Evaluating Risk Factors: Drinking Coffee

Evaluating your likely current (and near future) state of health means taking into account the risk factors — such as how much coffee you drink — that affect you.   Our medical diagnosis tool, The Analyst™, identifies major risk factors by asking the right questions.

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If you indicate coffee or tea consumption, The Analyst™ will ask further questions including this one:
How much caffeinated coffee do you drink on average?
Possible responses:
→ None / very little / don't know
→ About one cup per day
→ About two cups per day
→ About three cups per day
→ Four or more cups per day

The Diagnostic Process

Based on your response to this question, which may indicate no/low coffee consumption, coffee consumption or high coffee consumption, The Analyst™ will use differential diagnosis to consider possibilities such as:
Bladder Cancer

Studies linking coffee consumption with cancer are conflicting and inconclusive at this point, but there is a suggestion of a higher incidence of cancers of the pancreas, ovaries, bladder, and kidneys in coffee drinkers.

Calcium Requirement

Research has shown that drinking coffee causes a significant loss of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamins B and C, calcium, iron, and zinc.

Dehydration

Caffeine has a mild diuretic action and may thus worsen dehydration, except when taken during exercise.  One study found that the difference between ingesting the same volume of a non-caffeinated sports drink and the same drink containing caffeine (25mg per 100ml) was that urine production after the caffeinated drink was significantly higher at rest by 31%.  However, ingestion of caffeinated beverages during physical activity did not increase urine production and exacerbate dehydration.  [International Journal of Sports Medicine.  18: pp.4046-4053, 1997]

Gastric/Peptic/Duodenal Ulcers

The caffeine, oils and acids in coffee irritate the stomach lining, which can cause excessive production of stomach acid and lead to a variety of digestive disorders.  Decaf can also bring on a similar increase in stomach acid.  Research has shown a definite link between coffee drinking and ulcers.  Some anti-ulcer drugs, like cimetidine (Tagamet), slow down the rate at which the body metabolizes caffeine.  So not only does coffee increase the acid, but the drugs extend caffeine's effects by keeping it circulating longer.

Heartburn / GERD / Acid Reflux

Coffee affects the lower esophageal sphincter and thus contributes to the reflux of stomach acid into the throat (heartburn).

Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

Caffeine raises the production of the adrenal hormone cortisol, a stress hormone.  Cortisol causes the blood vessels to constrict and the heart to pump harder, which leads to high blood pressure.  Studies have shown that coffee seems to worsen the symptoms of persons with high blood pressure, and can nullify the effect of high blood pressure medications, making expensive drugs useless.

Iron Requirement

Research has shown that drinking coffee causes a significant loss of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamins B and C, calcium, iron, and zinc.

Kidney Cancer

Studies linking coffee consumption with cancer are conflicting and inconclusive at this point, but there is a suggestion of a higher incidence of cancers of the pancreas, ovaries, bladder, and kidneys in coffee drinkers.

Low Adrenal Function / Adrenal Insufficiency

Caffeine raises adrenaline levels and heavy coffee consumption can lead to a state of adrenal gland exhaustion, where the adrenal glands are no longer able to adequately respond to stress by releasing enough adrenaline.

Osteoporosis - Osteopenia

Drinking too much coffee increases risk of osteoporosis.  A study of 84,484 patients showed a correlation between bone fractures and heavy coffee consumption.

Ovarian Cancer

Studies linking coffee consumption with cancer are conflicting and inconclusive at this point, but there is a suggestion of a higher incidence of cancers of the pancreas, ovaries, bladder, and kidneys in coffee drinkers.

Pancreatic Cancer

Studies linking coffee consumption with cancer are conflicting and inconclusive at this point, but there is a suggestion of a higher incidence of cancers of the pancreas, ovaries, bladder, and kidneys in coffee drinkers.

Vitamin B-Complex Requirement

Research has shown that drinking coffee causes a significant loss of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamins B and C, calcium, iron, and zinc.

Vitamin C Requirement

Research has shown that drinking coffee causes a significant loss of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamins B and C, calcium, iron, and zinc.

Zinc Requirement

Research has shown that drinking coffee causes a significant loss of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamins B and C, calcium, iron, and zinc.

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